CECT





Intensive graduate seminar “Old religion and new spirituality: Continuity and changes in the background of secularization”

Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts
May 26-29, 2015
University of Tartu

The seminar will be held in conjunction with the conference “Old religion and new spirituality: Continuity and changes in the background of secularization” (May 26–29, 2015).
The seminar invites PhD students from various disciplines to discuss the historical roots and characteristics of the current religious situation in Estonia characterized by de-institutionalization and de-Christianization. Discussion topics may include the historical process of secularization, its specific features in different countries; combinations of religion and nationalism, effects of nationalism on public religion; changes in the traditional religious groups and churches in the 21st century; atheism and nonreligion, their organized and individual manifestations; and new spirituality, “New Age” and individual religiousness, mixed forms of organized and individual religion.

Invited speakers:

Prof Dr Detlef Pollack (University of Münster)

Prof Dr Paul Heelas (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
 

Dr Abby Day (University of Kent)

For the initial program of the conference, please see http://orns.ut.ee/program

The seminar consists of participation in the full conference program and a discussion conducted and moderated by the conference keynote lecturers Paul Heelas and Abby Day on May 29.

Requirements for participation
Interested graduate students can apply for the seminar by e-mail by March 13, 2015. Students who are not members of GSCSA are required to add a short CV to specify their education and research interests. E-mail address: ktkdk@ut.ee. Maximum number of participants is 16. You will be notified of your participation by March 30, 2015.
Participation in the course is free of charge; accommodation and travel costs of the students of GSCSA will be reimbursed. Working language of the seminar is English.
Reading material (both obligatory and suggested) is made available with the note of acceptance by the student coordinator.

The event is supported by the European Union through the European Social Fund (Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts).

Intensive graduate seminar/workshop
Cosmopolitan Anthropology
January 14–15, 2015, University of Tartu, Estonia

3–4 ECTS credits

Would it be possible to seriously think about a humanity without frontiers? This intensive seminar will introduce and contemplate the role of cosmopolitanism as a theory of human being, and as a methodology that cuts across disciplines engaged with the current issues of mobility, egalitarianism or free choice of identity. The cosmopolitan project seeks an alternative to constraining classifications and coercive communitarianism such as nationalism or ‘culturalism’. The proposed orientation to the world endeavours to emancipate the individual and the human from symbols and structures that collectivize, homogenize and totalize.
Paul Rabinow (1986): Let us define cosmopolitanism as an ethos of macro-interdependencies, with an acute consciousness (often forced upon people) of the inescapabilities and particularities of places, characters, historical trajectories and fates. The ethos of cosmopolitanism is highly attentive to and respectful of difference but also wary of the tendency for differences to become essentialized.
Pnina Werbner (2008): Cosmopolitanism is about reaching out across cultural differences through dialogue, aesthetic enjoyment, and respect; of living together with difference. Cosmopolitanism is something that emerges from cross-cultural debate: a dialogical, collective creation grounded in a sensibility of hospitality and openness to difference.
Nigel Rapport (2012): Cosmopolitanism offers an alternative to multiculturalism, a different vision of identity, belonging, solidarity and justice, that avoids the seemingly intractable character of identity politics: it identifies samenesses of the human condition that underlie the surface differences of history, culture and society, nation, ethnicity, religion, class and gender. This seminar is tacitly building on the interrelationship between anthropology and other academic fields. Anthropological thought and its methodology have augmented manifold research but its methods are likewise challenged by new intellectual developments.
The forum is convened by Prof Kristin Kuutma (University of Tartu) and Prof Patrick Laviolette (Tallinn University).

Invited speakers include:

Prof Nigel Rapport (University of St. Andrews, School of Philosophical, Anthropological and Film Studies) specializing in cosmopolitanism and liberalism, individuality, universalism, humanism and freedom.

Dr Huon Wardle (University of St. Andrews, Centre of Cosmopolitan Studies) specializing in cosmopolitanism and modernity, urbanism, creolization, selfhood, adventure and imagination.

Dr Andrew Irving (University of Manchester, Granada Centre of Visual Anthropology) specializing in cosmopolitanism and phenomenology and issues of health and embodiment.

Initial programme

Seminar consists of lectures and discussions conducted by guest lecturers, and roundtable discussions (requires previous preparation). Students are expected to do preparatory reading, participate in the full study programme, and submit a symposium diary (this can be a reflexion or summary of presentations most relevant to the student, about 1500 words) by January 30th, 2015.

ECTS points will be awarded on the following conditions:
3 ECTS on participation in the full seminar programme and + 1 ECTS on completion of a short symposium diary.

Requirements for participation
Interested graduate students can apply for the seminar by sending a short introduction specifying their education and research interests to ktkdk@ut.ee by December 17th, 2014. The working language of the seminar is English. Participation in the course is free of charge; accommodation and travel costs of the students of GSCSA will be reimbursed.

The event is supported by the European Union Social Fund and European Regional Development Fund (Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts & Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory).

Truth and Proof
Thinking Historically with Carlo Ginzburg
September 19–20, 2014, Tallinn University

Graduate course of the Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts
2 ECTS credits

Organized by the Estonian Institute of Humanities, Tallinn University, and Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts

This intensive seminar invites Ph.D. (and advanced M.A.) students in various fields of cultural research to discuss together with Prof. Carlo Ginzburg, one of the most original and influential historians of our time, the current issues of cultural history and culture studies. The seminar, consisting of lectures and discussions, addresses more specifically the complex relationship between truth and proof, both in historical and epistemological terms.

The general aim of this seminar is an interdisciplinary discussion of current research topics methodologies in culture studies, the enhancement of international cooperation in scholarship, and the involvement of young researchers or graduate students in an academic exchange of ideas that would go beyond the usual conference or lecture outline. The participants will include, in addition to prof. Ginzburg, five established Estonian scholars and about twenty-five doctoral students.
Carlo Ginzburg (born in Turin in 1939) is a Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles, author of a considerable oeuvre, comprising about twenty books. He has ranged very widely in his scholarly work, but his main and major contributions have been made as an historian of early modern Europe. A pioneering work of microhistory, Il formaggio e i vermi (The Cheese and the Worms, 1976) remains one of the most successful and widely-imitated examples of the genre. As well as being a highly imaginative and productive historian, Professor Ginzburg has been a methodological innovator of wide influence. He has written about the nature of historical evidence in Miti emblemi spie (1986; Clues, Myths and the Historical Method, 1989), and about the idea of historical proof in History, Rhetoric and Proof (1999). He has also reflected in his historical works on the nature of his own practice, highlighting in particular the importance of the connections between anthropology and cultural history.

September 19, 2014 (open for public)
Venue: Tallinn University (Uus-Sadama 5), M-134

16:00–16:15 Introduction
Dr. Marek Tamm (Tallinn University)
16:15–17:15 Schema and Bias: A Historian’s Reflection on Double-Blind Experiments
Prof. em. Carlo Ginzburg (University of California, Los Angeles)
17:15–17.45 Discussion
Venue: Tallinn University (Uus-Sadama 5), Atrium (3rd floor)
18:00–19:00 Public presentation of the Estonian translation of Carlo Ginzburg’s book No Island is an Island (Tallinn University Press, 2014)

September 20, 2014 (for registered participants)
Venue: Tallinn University (Uus-Sadama 5), M-648

Seminar
Chair Dr. Marek Tamm
10:00–11:00 On Small Differences: Ekphrasis and Connoisseurship
Prof. em. Carlo Ginzburg (University of California, Los Angeles)
11:00–11:40 History as Amplification
Mr. Hent Kalmo (Université Paris X-Nanterre)
11:40–12:20 Going Vernacular, or On the Benefits of Distance and Peripheral Vision
Prof. Tiina Kirss (Tallinn University)
12:30–14:00 Lunch for registered participants
14:00–14.40 What Does the Estonian Werewolf History Tell Us About the Thiess’ Trial?
Dr. Merili Metsvahi (University of Tartu)
14.40–15:20 Towards the Semiotics of (In)sincerity
Prof. Mihhail Lotman (Tallinn University / University of Tartu)
15:20–16:00 Towards a History of Truth: Some Theoretical Reflections and Medieval Examples
Dr. Marek Tamm (Tallinn University)
16:00–16:30 Concluding discussion

Requirements for participation
Interested graduate students (maximum 25) can apply for the seminar by sending a letter of motivation (ca 100 words) to Tuuli Piirsalu (tuulip@ehi.ee) by September 5, 2014. Students who are not members of GSCSA are required to add a short CV to specify their education and research interests. You will be notified of your participation by September 8, 2014.

Students are expected to do preparatory reading in order to participate in the discussions. Upon full participation in the study programme and completion of a 2000-word essay (in Estonian or in English) in connection to Carlo Ginzburg’s work (deadline November 30, 2014) students will be awarded 2 ECTS points.

The language of the seminar is English.
Participation in the course is free of charge; the accommodation and travel costs of the students of GSCSA will be reimbursed.

Program director: Marek Tamm
Student coordinator: Tuuli Piirsalu

More information here
See Carlo Ginzburg's lecture here

Intensive Graduate Seminar "Cultural Polyglotism: From Intertextuality to Cross-mediality"

March 2, 2012
University of Tartu

Graduate course of the Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts (GSCSA) 2 ECTS credits (1 without presentation)

Organized by the Department of Semiotics of the University of Tartu; Estonian Semiotic Association; Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts (European Social Fund); Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory (European Regional Development Fund)

The seminar focuses on strategies of communication and interpretation that appear with cultural polyglotism. The aim is to analyse intertextuality and cross-mediality as well as other notions from this terminological field as parameters of cultural polyglotism. The course takes place in parallel with the conference “Cultural polyglotism” dedicated to Juri Lotman's 90th anniversary (Tartu, Feb 28 - March 2, 2012). Students’ attendance at the conference is recommended.

The seminar includes three sessions, each 90 minutes. First session is for discussion on topics brought up from preparatory readings; this is coordinated by professors Boris Uspenski (Moscow), Margherita De Michiel (Bologna), Katalin Kroó (Budapest), Indrek Ibrus (Tallinn) and Peeter Torop (Tartu). Second session is for presentations by doctoral students and discussion on presentations. Third session is dedicated to general discussion as well as drawing conclusions from perspectives of methodology and applications.

Requirements for participation
Interested graduate students can apply for the seminar by e-mail by January 20, 2012, specifying a preferred way of participation (with/without presentation). Students who are not members of GSCSA are required to add a short CV to specify their education and research interests.

Reading material (obligatory and additional) is made available with the note of acceptance by January 27, 2012.

The abstract for student presentation (2500-3000 characters, related with the topic of the seminar and PhD thesis) is due to February 10. Program of the seminar will be confirmed by February 17.

Maximum number of participants is 15. The program includes 4-5 student presentations.

E-mail address: ktkdk@ut.ee The language of the course is English. Participation at the seminar will be free of charge for the confirmed participants (including accommodation and food). More information about accommodation choices will be provided for the participants.

Program director: Peeter Torop
Seminar assistant: Andreas Ventsel, Tiit Remm
Student coordinator: Helen Kästik, ktkdk@ut.ee

Please find more information on GSCSA homepage http://www.ema.edu.ee/ktkdk/?s=187
http://www.ut.ee/SOSE/conference/2012_lotman/abstracts.html

Program (PDF)


Intensive graduate seminar "Analysis of knowledge production in the context of (national) heritage scholarship"

December 9-10, 2011
Degree Course of the Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts (GSCSA)

Organized by the University of Tartu; Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts; ESF Grant “Analysis of Knowledge Production in the Context of (National) Heritage Scholarship“; Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory (CECT)

2 ECTS credits

The seminar on knowledge production proposes to look at sources and practices of ’knowledge production’ that could be largely termed as cultural heritage studies. This inquiry proceeds from a reflexive investigation of disciplinary histories of scholarship embedded in and shaping the nation-building processes (e.g. ethnology, history, literature, etc). The making of archives and museums, the formation of depositories for past repertories, and for records of past cultural practices or artefacts – all backed by the establishment of relevant academic programmes – has inherently served the purpose of creating a national cultural heritage.

With a view of unraveling the institutionalization and social dissemination of scholarly knowledge, we propose to explore the politics of institutions, the knowledge legacies of seminal figures in the field and the identification of their object of research from a historical perspective and in relevant socio-political context, while taking into account particular rhetoric and political contingencies. The study of knowledge making practices in cultural research sheds light on disciplinary histories, the authoritative positions created, and the establishment of institutionalized knowledge format. The aim of this event is an interdisciplinary discussion of current research methodologies, the enhancement of international cooperation in scholarship, and the involvement of young researchers or graduate students in an academic exchange of ideas that would go beyond the usual conference or lecture outline. The participants will include nine established scholars and twenty doctoral students.

The scholars participating at the seminar and their topics of interest are following:

Prof. Simon Knell (University of Leicester) “Approaching the object“
Prof. Kristin Kuutma (University of Tartu) “Knowledge production and ethnographic representation”
Prof. Stefan Berger (University of Bochum/University of Manchester) “National archives, national museums and national histories in nineteenth and twentieth century Europe”
Dr. Marek Tamm (Tallinn University) “Afterlife of events: How past becomes historical?“
Prof. Dr. Regina Bendix (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen) “One language, three research cultures: German language Volkskunde after 1945”
Dr. Mikaela Fenske (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen) “Narrating region, narrating nation”
Dr. Monika Baar (University of Groningen) – the role of academies, learned and literary societies in the foundation and institutionalization of the national heritage
Dr. Pertti Anttonen (University of Helsinki) “Tradition and heritage as lists and catalogues“
Dr. Ergo-Hart Västrik (University of Tartu) “Folklore archives and political change”

Organization
The graduate school program consists of academic presentations and discussions.
The seminar will be carried out in 4 sessions. Each session will include about 3 presentations of 20 minutes with a longer discussion to follow, where the main discussants are expected to be the presenters themselves.

Key topics:
1. nationalism and ethnographic studies
2. nationalism and history (historical records)
3. heritage and literature (literary works)
4. knowledge production and heritage (conceptualization of heritage)

The essence of the session will be discussion. Each lecturer chooses 1-2 relevant articles/chapters for student assignment.

Students are proposed to give a 10 minute talk on their research topic or write a reflection (1500-2500 words) on the seminar by December 29. Student presentations are chosen by the organizers via abstracts sent for application and assigned to a matching session.

Requirements for participation
Interested graduate students should send an abstract (500-600 words) related to the key topics of the seminar by November 5, 2011. Students who are not members of GSCSA are required to add a short CV to specify their education and research interests.
E-mail address: ktkdk@ut.ee
You will be notified of the acceptance of your contribution by November 12, 2011. The literature of the seminar will be available by that time.

Seminar venue and practical side
Graduate seminar takes place in Tartu: Zaal, Raekoja square 10, III floor.
The language of the course is English. Participation at the seminar will be free of charge for the confirmed participants (this includes accommodation, food). More information about accommodation choices will be provided for the participants.

Programme director: Kristin Kuutma
Seminar assistant: Monika Tasa
Student coordinator: Helen Kästik, ktkdk@ut.ee

Seminar is supported by the European Social Fund (GSCSA), European Regional Fund (CECT), European Science Foundation (ETF Grant No. 7795).


Graduate School in Environmental History "The Co-formation of Human and Natural Communities: An Environmental Historical Perspective"

May 20.-22., 2011
Muhu, Estonia

Degree Course of the Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts (GSCSA)

Organized by the University of Tartu, Department of Semiotics; Under and Tuglas Literature Center; Jakob von Uexküll Centre; Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts; Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory (CECT)

2 ECTS credits

The graduate school in environmental history aims to create a base for meetings and discussions for young scholars working on topics concerning the historical co-formation of cultural and natural environments. Environmental history is a relatively new interdisciplinary field of research that combines two lines of thought. Firstly, cultural and historical changes are strongly intertwined with natural changes, and historical research has to explain how the two influence each other. Secondly, that our present attitudes and activities in and towards nature have their own historical and cultural roots that should be explored carefully in order to understand existing environmental problems. Environmental history tries to link global environmental discourses with place-sensitive studies by exploring local and regional particularities in the development of the human-nature ties, thereby overcoming nationally fixed approaches in history and culture studies.

Key topics of the graduate school:

- Case studies in Baltic environmental history in its different geopolitical contexts (Baltic Sea region, Russian and Swedish Empire, Baltic states, Baltic provinces, Old-Livonia)
- Cultural and natural exchange between past and present marine and land communities
- Contacts between colonial powers and local environments
- Historical origins and formation of current environmental problems and solutions

Plenary speakers:

Alf Hornborg (University of Lund) abstract
Bernhard Gißibl (University of Mannheim) abstract
Kalevi Kull (Univeristy of Tartu) abstract
Diana Mincyte (Yale University) abstract
Tiina Peil (Tallinn University) abstract
Gregory Quenet (University of Versailles Saint Quentin) abstract
Kati Lindström (University of Tartu)  abstract
Ulrike Plath (Under and Tuglas Literature Center, Tallinn) abstract

SEE THE PROGRAMME

Organisation

The graduate school program consists of plenary talks, graduate student presentations, discussions, as well as a field trip. The summer school is planned for 20 participants (8 plenary speakers, 12 graduate students).

All students are asked to give a 20 minute talk on their research topic, which will be followed by a 15-20 minute discussion led by two commentators (one plenary speaker and one graduate student). The texts of the presentations will be available for all participants 2 weeks before the seminar. The plenary lectures will be 45 minutes each and will be supplemented by an online compendium of basic texts in environmental history. After two days of intensive discussions we will go for an environmental historical field trip on Muhu island on the third day.

Interested graduate students should send an abstract (300-600 words) of their talk by the 14th of March 2011 to the following mail addresses:
Ulrike Plath: ulrike@utkk.ee
Riin Magnus: riin.magnus@ut.ee

You will be notified of the acceptance of your contribution by the 15th of February 2011. Participation in the seminar will be free of charge for the confirmed participants (this includes accommodation, food, field trip). The summer school will take place on Muhu island (http://www.muhu.info/eng/) in Koguva village in Vanatoa tourist farm (http://www.vanatoa.ee/lang/eng).

GSCSA and CECT are financed by the European Union Structural Assistance.



Intensive Graduate Seminar "Animals, Culture, Environment"

April 6-8, 2011
Tartu, Estonia


Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu

Organized in the framework of the international conference “Zoosemiotics and Animal Representations”

People live and communicate with animals. There is a tremendous amount of pictures, stories and myths about animals and human-animal relations in the history of culture. Sharing the same physical space with other animal species produces hybrid environments, zoos being an exemplary case. There is even a certain amount of animality in our everyday perception, thinking and communication, as a trace of our common evolutionary heritage with other animal species. The aim of the intensive graduate seminar is to make such subtle connections visible by using the methods of zoosemiotics, visual semiotics and ecocriticism. Students are encouraged to develop a fresh view on their own research objects by “learning from animals” and using the perspective of animality.

Instructors:

Elena Grigorjeva, Senior Research Fellow, Department of Semiotics, University of Tartu. Author of Emblema: Structure and Pragmatics (2001). Specialist in visual semiotics and emblematics. Conducts study groups: What can we learn from animals I, II.

Aleksei Turovski, Lecturer at the Department of Psychology, Tallinn University, zoologist at the Tallinn Zoo. Author of Naturally Animal [Loomult loom] (2004); Animals: From Ant to Whale [Loomad. Sipelgast vaalani] (2007). Conducts study group: Animals in myth and culture.

Jesper Hoffmeyer, Professor emeritus, Biological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Specialist in biosemiotics and in semiotics of evolution. Author of Biosemiotics. An Examination into the Signs of Life and the Life of Signs (2008), Signs of Meaning in the Universe (1996). Presents a biosemiotic view in the lecture on the role of semiotic processes in the evolution of animate nature, From genetic to semiotic scaffolding.

David Rothenberg, Professor of Philosophy and Music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA. Author of Thousand Mile Song: Whale Music in a Sea of Sound (2008), Why Birds Sing: A Journey Into the Mystery of Bird Song (2006), a. o. Specialist in animal philosophy and music. Presents a view on music as a model for understanding complex animal communication in the lecture Animal music, animal aesthetics.

Graham Huggan, Professor of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Literatures at University of Leeds, UK. Author of Postcolonial Ecocriticism: Literature, Animals, Environment (with H. Tiffin 2010), Extreme Pursuits: Travel/Writing in an Age of Globalization (2009) a. o. Specialist in postcolonial studies and literatures. Presents a postcolonial interpretation of the nature documentary in the lecture, Attenborough, colonialism and the British tradition of nature documentary.

The intensive graduate seminar invites Ph.D. students in various fields of cultural research to participate in an interdisciplinary study group of 20 students. The intensive graduate seminar combines the workshops and group work with access to the state of art research presented at the conference “Zoosemiotics and Animal Representations”. The seminar includes 3 lectures (by J. Hoffmeyer, G. Huggan, D. Rothenberg), 3 workshops (by E. Grigorjeva and A. Turovski) and 3 open round tables (Titled: Futures of Zoosemiotics, Zoo as a Semiotic Environment, Animals and Ecocriticism). Students are expected to do preparatory reading in order to participate in the seminar. Upon full participation in the study programme and completion of a 3000-word essay on the applicability of the semiotic and cultural studies perspective of animals in their own research topic (deadline May 15, 2011) students will receive 4 ECTS points (if an essay will not be submitted, students will receive 2 ECTS).

The language of the seminar is English.

Please send:
- a motivation letter explaining why you wish to participate in this seminar (200-300 words)
- a short CV (not needed for GSCSA students)
by February 28, 2011, to ktkdk@ut.ee. You will be notified of the acceptance of your contribution by March 7, 2011.

Participation in the course is free of charge; the accommodation and travel costs of the students of GSCSA will be reimbursed. Accommodation will be arranged by the organizers, travel details will be provided for the participants.

Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts and the Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory are funded by the European Union Structural Assistance.

Additional information: student coordinator Helen Kästik, ktkdk@ut.ee
 



Narrative Interactions: Stories, Identities and Voices

October 1.-3., 2010
Sagadi, Estonia

Intensive graduate seminar co-sponsored by the Estonian Graduate School of Culture Studies and Arts (GSCSA), Centre of Excellence in Cultural Theory (CECT) and Nordic Network of Narrative Studies (NNNS).

People use stories as a tool for thinking, orienting themselves in the world and coping with the tremendous increase of information in modern culture. New situations and new forms of communication often involve new challenges and strains: in response, people tend to develop new narrative and behavioral strategies to adapt themselves to constraints the situation puts on them or to test new opportunities it offers. The present seminar seeks to explore these strategies, particularly management of subjectivity (identity, voice) in fictional storytelling, online communication and the stituation of illness.

Instructors:

Ruth Page (University of Leicester, UK). Voices and Identities on the Web (Online Communities, Personal Blogs and Discussion Forums)

Emergent forms of social media (such as blogs, wikis, social networking sites) have enabled people to self-publish their life experiences and to connect with online audiences with unprecedented measure. We will be looking at the ways in which the autobiographical story fragments found in these online contexts challenge canonical definitions of 'narrative', are shaped by their participatory discourse context and perform crucial identity and interpersonal work for their authors.

Marina Grishakova (University of Tartu, Estonia). Basic Concepts: Stories, Identities and Voices

This workshop introduces basic narratological concepts (story, voice, identity) used in the study of written and oral narratives and provides background knowledge for other modules. Students are expected to read and analyse excerpts from classical works on these concepts (Bakhtin, Genette, Aczel, Lanser and others).

Jan Alber (University of Freiburg, Germany). Unnatural Voices and Impossible Identities

This module seeks to familiarize students with the wide range of physically or logically impossible narrators and characters in fictional narratives. More specifically, we will look at speaking animals, 'omniscient' first-person narrators, and impossible characters, and, in a second step, explore their potential functions.

Lars-Christer Hydén (University of Linköping, Sweden). Voices of Illness and Disability

In my lecture I will give an overview of the research on illness and narrative, with a special emphasis on research about storytelling by persons having some kind of communicative disability. Quite often illness narratives are thought of as stories about illness. A more difficult and maybe less studied area has to do with the ways diseases affect the ability to tell stories, as for instance in patients with brain injuries or Alzheimer’s disease. In these cases the disease affects both cognitive and linguistic abilities making it difficult to tell stories that adhere to the conventional narrative norms.

The seminar invites Ph.D. and M.A. students in various fields of cultural research to participate in an interdisciplinary study group of 20-30 students. The seminar offers 4 workshops by invited lecturers. Students are expected to do preparatory reading in order to participate in the workshops. Upon full participation in the study programme and completion of a 3500-4000-word essay (deadline November 5, 2010) students will be awarded 2 ECTS points.

The language of the seminar is English.

Please send:
- the motivation letter explaining why you wish to participate in this seminar (200-300 words)
- short CV (not needed for GSCSA students)
by June 14, 2010, to ktkdk@ut.ee . You will be notified of the acceptance of your contribution by June 25, 2010.

A course fee is not required; the accommodation and travel costs of the students of GSCSA and NNNS will be reimbursed. Accommodation will be arranged by the organizers, travel details will be provided for the participants.

Additional information: Monika Tasa, ktkdk@ut.ee



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